​​Indigenous Thoughts Network 



PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION

PHILOSOPHY BY REGION

BRUCE FERGUSON'S

PROJECTS

​Where the Rivers Meet (WTRM) Website

YOUR SQUAW IS ON THE WARPATH TONIGHT

Loretta Lynn (1960s)


Well your pet name for me is Squaw
When you come home a drinkin' and can barely crawl
And all that lovin' on me won't make things right

Well you're leavin' me at home to keep the tee pee clean
A-six papooses to break and wean
Well, your Squaw is on the warpath tonight

Well I found out, a-big brave chief
The game you were huntin' for ain't beef
Get offa my huntin' grounds and get outta my sight

This-a war dance I'm doin' means I'm fightin' mad
You don't need no more of what you've already had
Your Squaw is on the warpath tonight

Well-a that fire water that a you've been drinkin'
Makes you feel bigger but chief you're shrinkin'
Since you've been on that love makin' diet

Now don't hand me that old peace pipe
There ain't no pipe can settle this fight
Your Squaw is on the warpath tonight

Well I found out a-big brave chief
The game you're a hunting for ain't beef
Get offa my huntin' grounds and get outta my sight

This-a war dance I'm doin' means I'm fightin' mad
You don't need no more of what you've already had
Your Squaw is on the warpath tonight
Yeah, your Squaw is on the warpath tonight



What Is an ePortfolio?

Academic electronic portfolios (ePortfolios) are online illustrations of your professional “self.” They include important examples of your skills and achievements, as well as space to present who you are in your academic workplace through your teaching and research statements, as well as through evidence of your research, scholarship, critical teaching, and, if you choose, examples of your students’ critical learning. The documents you create to place in your ePortfolio are visual proof of your talents and interests. The best way to think about your ePortfolio is that it is an ever-evolving three-dimensional space to organize your thoughts and beliefs about why you do what you do professionally. The best portfolios are self-reflective.

The work you choose to place in your ePortfolio is concrete and visual proof of your talents and areas of interest. Well-designed portfolios help you create, maintain, and engage in self-inquiry that systematizes and organizes your professional path, including your research, scholarship, and your critical teaching and learning. Look critically at what you do, and what you research. Ask yourself what your students are learning, beyond the content. Think about how you teach and research, not simply about what you teach and research.

Think about how to make the “professional you” as an academic “visible.” Make your intellectual work as teacher, researcher, and learner—and the values which drive this work—visible to those who assess you, might hire you, or might doubt you. ePortfolios are the place to clearly state that you know what you do, why you do it, and how you do it. You have done the work. Let others see it for themselves.

Why Do I Need an ePortfolio?

Pat Hutchings, from the Carnegie Foundation on the Advancement of Teaching, writes, “Excellent [academics are] those who set out to inquire into their own practice, identifying key issues they want to pursue, posing questions for themselves, exploring alternatives and taking risks, and doing all of this in the company of peers who can offer critique and support.” This is perhaps the most compelling personal reason to create an ePortfolio.

Creating and gathering the documents for your ePortfolio is a lot of work, but in the current economic climate, and even if you are tenured, consider creating an ePortfolio to represent your scholarly work. If you think about it, building an ePortfolio is a scholarly product in itself. Even academic administrators (who are usually hired “at will” without a contract) should build ePortfolios to showcase their work, thinking, ethos, attention to mission, students, faculty, and presentations.

Faculty should make their professional life visible because administrators are under pressure (primarily due to the economic climate) to illustrate how productive the faculty are, and the faculty, in turn, are under pressure to show their chairs and administrators how good they are.

Now that you know what an ePortfolio is and why it is important, in the next blog entries you will learn how to put your portfolio together.

To begin, gather in a folder the professional documents you already have, such as:

Curriculum Vitae (CV)
Résumé
References
Teaching Statement
Research Statement
Student Evaluations

If you don’t have some or all of these documents, don’t worry, you will learn how to create them as you advance through this series. For now, start by writing and collecting lists of your accomplishments, courses taught, publications, conference presentations, student work, student evaluations, supervisor evaluations, and other evidence of your scholarly efforts.


ABOVE:  Then in the 70's being Indigenous was sexy eh...but stereotypical nonetheless....